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  1. #1
    Senior Member derek33's Avatar
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    Class II vs. Class III

    Recently Cherokee casino in NC went to Class III slots. I noticed that most all their aristocrat machines have stayed as Cherokee raffle reels or Class II. I don't know enough about the difference between the classes, but it struck me as to "why"??

    Aristocrat is by far the most played and lucrative slot at Cherokee.......So is it advantageous for the casino to keep a slot as Class II vs class III?? All other slots other than aristocrat have been converted to Class III

  2. #2
    Senior Member onenickelmiracle's Avatar
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    Besides tax ramifications Warren sometimes will mention, maybe more players are comfortable with class III besides regulars. I wonder if class III machines offer more flexibility to change things payback wise. When you deal with bingo, is the math limited to fractions since each combination is a fraction of real numbers and maybe the casino can keep the difference, if that makes any sense.

    I really have no reason to comment since I am not knowledgeable enough to know, but that is my guess.
    Last edited by onenickelmiracle; 10-21-2012 at 11:29 PM.
    The difference 1/2% makes means the "must hit" $45/$50 would have been won by the guy playing from $40 to $45 with the extra 1/2%.

  3. #3
    Administrator Deb's Avatar
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    Got this from Wikipedia:

    Slot machine classes

    The statements are generalities, not actual laws for every jurisdiction. These classifications may vary from state to state. 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq. governs gambling machines or "slot" machines. This provision is known as the Johnson Act.
    Some states have restrictions on the type (called "class") of slot machines that can be used in a casino or other gaming area. "Class III" (or "traditional") slot machines operate independently from a centralized computer system and a player's chance of winning any payout is the same with every play. Class III slot machines are most often seen in Nevada or Atlantic City and are sometimes referred to as "Vegas-style slots."
    "Class II" slot machines (also known as "video lottery terminals" or "VLTs") are connected to a centralized computer system that determines the outcome of each wager. In this way, Class II slot machines mimic scratch-off lottery tickets in that each machine has an equal chance of winning a series of limited prizes. Either class of slot machines may or may not have a player skill element.
    In general a game must have all characteristics of a Class II game to be a Class II game. Any characteristic of a Class III game makes it a Class III game. The casino pays a fee to the state for each Class III game and can only purchase so many Class III licenses. There is no such restriction for Class II games. Class II games are not so tightly regulated by the state.
    [edit]Class II game characteristics


    1. The player is playing against other players and competing for a common prize.
    2. There is not necessarily a winner in each game. The game continues until there is a winner.
    3. In a given set there are a certain number of wins and losses. Once a certain combination has occurred it cannot occur again until a new batch is initiated. This is most obvious in scratch-card games using cards that come in packs. Once a card has been pulled from a pack, the combinations on that card cannot occur again until a new pack of cards is installed. One game is dependent on previous games.
    4. The player must be an active participant. They must recognize events as they occur and must recognize when they have won and announce their winning. Bingo is an excellent example here.
    5. All players play from the same set of numbers as the numbers are announced.

    [edit]Class III game characteristics


    1. The player is playing against the house.
    2. Each game is independent of previous games. Any possible outcome can occur in any game.
    3. Wins are announced automatically


    Notice it mentions a different license for each class. I wonder if their licensing changed?
    My personal YouTube Channel Link: www.youtube.com/bonusqueendeb

  4. #4
    Senior Member derek33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deb View Post
    Got this from Wikipedia:

    Slot machine classes

    The statements are generalities, not actual laws for every jurisdiction. These classifications may vary from state to state. 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq. governs gambling machines or "slot" machines. This provision is known as the Johnson Act.
    Some states have restrictions on the type (called "class") of slot machines that can be used in a casino or other gaming area. "Class III" (or "traditional") slot machines operate independently from a centralized computer system and a player's chance of winning any payout is the same with every play. Class III slot machines are most often seen in Nevada or Atlantic City and are sometimes referred to as "Vegas-style slots."
    "Class II" slot machines (also known as "video lottery terminals" or "VLTs") are connected to a centralized computer system that determines the outcome of each wager. In this way, Class II slot machines mimic scratch-off lottery tickets in that each machine has an equal chance of winning a series of limited prizes. Either class of slot machines may or may not have a player skill element.
    In general a game must have all characteristics of a Class II game to be a Class II game. Any characteristic of a Class III game makes it a Class III game. The casino pays a fee to the state for each Class III game and can only purchase so many Class III licenses. There is no such restriction for Class II games. Class II games are not so tightly regulated by the state.
    [edit]Class II game characteristics


    1. The player is playing against other players and competing for a common prize.
    2. There is not necessarily a winner in each game. The game continues until there is a winner.
    3. In a given set there are a certain number of wins and losses. Once a certain combination has occurred it cannot occur again until a new batch is initiated. This is most obvious in scratch-card games using cards that come in packs. Once a card has been pulled from a pack, the combinations on that card cannot occur again until a new pack of cards is installed. One game is dependent on previous games.
    4. The player must be an active participant. They must recognize events as they occur and must recognize when they have won and announce their winning. Bingo is an excellent example here.
    5. All players play from the same set of numbers as the numbers are announced.

    [edit]Class III game characteristics


    1. The player is playing against the house.
    2. Each game is independent of previous games. Any possible outcome can occur in any game.
    3. Wins are announced automatically


    Notice it mentions a different license for each class. I wonder if their licensing changed?
    Interesting......still wondering as to why they left the aristocrat as Class II

  5. #5
    Senior Member Moneybags's Avatar
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    You have to separate how it was sold to the states and the courts - traditional bingo - from what it really is: virtual bingo, where every spin is a new "card," and a computer is "calling" balls continuously, and there are multiple "winners" every second. As far as the casual player is concerned there is no apparent difference from Class III. And you experts out there please don't lecture me, I do know there is a difference.

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