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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich99 View Post
    Yes in many ways the 50's were wonderful... A simpler less stressful time, a time when most families were together. It was a different world...
    I remember when I was a young boy maybe 7 or 8 yrs old, I used to love visiting my grandmother. Every couple of months Mom & Dad would drop me off for a few days and come back and get me lol. She had an apple tree in her back yard, I used to climb the tree and pick apples and watch her roll the dough and make pie ... I remember across the street there was a Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) , I used to stare out the window and watch the big bucket slowly spin at the top of a high pole. Underneath the bucket was a large sign that read "We Fix Sunday Dinner 7 Days A Week". And sure enough every Sunday as soon as Church let out the parking lot was full! And I'd watch all the people walk back to their cars carrying big buckets and all their sides
    What is a little sad is if a restaurant displayed that sign today a lot of our younger generation would ask Whats up with Sunday? Whats that all about?...
    20yrs later I purchased the property and that same KFC is my tenant. Over the past 30yrs 3 times they asked me to lower their rent and deed them over more land so they could have a drive thru, all was done because they are a very good tenant, they never bother me about anything...
    So Yes "Happier times are ahead if we all do our part" and that includes leaving some toilet paper & paper towels in the store for someone else! lol
    I'm not sure if i'd be having this problem back in the 50's...

    What a wonderful story to share with us. Thank you.

    You and I grew up about the same time with similar experiences and memories. My great grandparents had owned quite a bit of property with a small lake on it, back in the early 1900's. For many years they made a comfortable living in the Ice Business. Many reading this would say What ? Ice ?
    Most have never heard the term, " Ice Box ", but back then that was the only form of refrigeration. Large blocks of Ice resting over the top of a closed cabinet to keep perishables from spoiling. All winter long they would cut blocks of Ice out of the lake and store them in a well insulated building for delivery the rest of the year. Early on it was delivered door to door from a Horse drawn Cart. My Grandfather took it over when my Great Grandparents passed on, and my Dad worked there as well until he enlisted in WW11.
    After the War an invention called the " Refrigerator " was a necessity for everyone and put an end to the Ice Business. My parents purchased my Grandfathers house on the lake and that's where I grew up with my brother. There were abandoned open pit mines miles away from us that had flooded and were teaming with all sorts of fresh water fish which we all spent a lot of time catching and transporting to our lake for neighborhood recreational fishing, and it became a very popular area on the weekends for family picnics.
    We eventually opened a small stand serving sandwiches, burgers, fries, ice cream, and cold drinks on weekends for the locals.
    As you said, it was a wonderful time to be alive, everyone knew everyone else, and it was like one big family. As Kuda said, no one locked their doors, and always left their car keys in the ignition. We had a Milk Man who came right up and left it on your porch or front steps, and a local grocery store who did the same thing on deliveries and always said, " You can settle up when you get paid "... Try that today, and you would be at the Mercy of " Porch Pirates "..
    I think back often to those days, an am deeply saddened that our kids and grandchildren will never know those kind of times.

  2. #12
    Senior Member wendy's Avatar
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    Steph, Rich and Andy ~ thank-you for your beautiful posts/stories that made my Sunday coffee taste even better. Nostalgia is a very potent antidote to very trying times like now and you blasted us away to a happier place even just for a moment. Happy Sunday!
    Home is where the heart is but any spare change I find goes in the Vegas Fund!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sq33756 View Post
    My son is a widower Dad and has four kids and lost his job in all this(He doesn't work for one of those companies that pays everyone through the shutdown. Bless you for being one of those who do, Rich.). So our stimulus goes to him and his family. I am sure parents and grandparents everywhere are doing the same. I grew up in the 50's, a fanciful time. I just don't know how families get by these days and now this. Happier times are ahead if we all do our part.
    We have no children and all our relatives are doing as well financially as we are. I thought about getting the stimulus in $20 bills and handing them out in the super market to needy looking persons but my neighbor convinced me that was a bad idea. I've never taken a $2400 bankroll into a casino so I figured this would be a good time to experience some high roll action. Ultimate X poker. dollar denomination, Ten Play, Jacks or Better, Max Bet. Who knows - I might hit a Royal with a multiplier. If it turns out well I'll give the profits to the Church for Charity distribution. If it doesn't then the Chief and Tribal members will be the stimulated ones.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettin Man View Post
    What a wonderful story to share with us. Thank you.

    You and I grew up about the same time with similar experiences and memories. My great grandparents had owned quite a bit of property with a small lake on it, back in the early 1900's. For many years they made a comfortable living in the Ice Business. Many reading this would say What ? Ice ?
    Most have never heard the term, " Ice Box ", but back then that was the only form of refrigeration. Large blocks of Ice resting over the top of a closed cabinet to keep perishables from spoiling. All winter long they would cut blocks of Ice out of the lake and store them in a well insulated building for delivery the rest of the year. Early on it was delivered door to door from a Horse drawn Cart. My Grandfather took it over when my Great Grandparents passed on, and my Dad worked there as well until he enlisted in WW11.
    After the War an invention called the " Refrigerator " was a necessity for everyone and put an end to the Ice Business. My parents purchased my Grandfathers house on the lake and that's where I grew up with my brother. There were abandoned open pit mines miles away from us that had flooded and were teaming with all sorts of fresh water fish which we all spent a lot of time catching and transporting to our lake for neighborhood recreational fishing, and it became a very popular area on the weekends for family picnics.
    We eventually opened a small stand serving sandwiches, burgers, fries, ice cream, and cold drinks on weekends for the locals.
    As you said, it was a wonderful time to be alive, everyone knew everyone else, and it was like one big family. As Kuda said, no one locked their doors, and always left their car keys in the ignition. We had a Milk Man who came right up and left it on your porch or front steps, and a local grocery store who did the same thing on deliveries and always said, " You can settle up when you get paid "... Try that today, and you would be at the Mercy of " Porch Pirates "..
    I think back often to those days, an am deeply saddened that our kids and grandchildren will never know those kind of times.

    Andy, Rich, and all others who grew up in those amazing times.... thank you for sharing those memories!! I often think back, and wonder if it was just my childlike viewpoint, or if they really were "the good ol' days". I lived in town... my grandparents lived about 10 blocks from us. Daily in the summer, I would go to their house for a visit. My grandmother was a fantastic cook, and always had some sort of baked goods ready for guests. Many mid-mornings, I was able to sample them warm out of the oven. If I was lucky, my grandfather was home ( he worked for the IRS and traveled a lot) and he would give me a dime or quarter ( back then, that was a LOT of money for a kid!!). There was a small grocery store ( they were all small back then) up the street on my way home.... Washington Grocery ( named after the street it was on). They had the most glorious selection of "penny candy" a kid could want. I would stop there on my way home, and fill up a small paper sack with treats... Black Jack gum, Beeman's gum, cinnamon bears, Tootsie Rolls, Bit O' Honey, Black Cow or Slow Poke suckers, Tootsie Pops... if it was a hot day, a Dreamsicle or Banana flavored Popsicle.

    The town I lived in was a tourist destination, and was built on a lake... so I spent my summers playing in the sand and water, returning home only for lunch, supper, and bedtime. There was a rec center there, and one could check out board games, tennis rackets, etc. and play all day. I spent hours riding my bike there and back... my towel for the beach wrapped around my handlebars. Winter brought sledding, and ice skating at a small ice rink about 1 block from our home. I can still remember the sound of the door that opened and closed as the kids came and went out of the warming house. It was a log cabin... with a santa-looking older man who ran it. In the center of the warming house was a big green barrel thing that he would stoke with wood. It smelled like a campfire in there all the time. The wood on the floor was fuzzy from so many ice skates cutting it up. Our mittens were made out of knit wool back then, and they would cake with snow that would ball up on them. "Santa" would take them from us, and place them on this huge, hot barrel.... they would sizzle as the snow melted from them... I can still hear and s-m-e-l-l that wool as it heated up on that wood stove. When the mittens were dry... Santa would flip them, and dry them for us... he tended those mittens like a short order cook, never letting them burn. When they were dry, he would give them back to us.. all warm and ready for our chilled fingers. I can remember the sound of our snow pants too, as we walked inside that warming house.

    We had no TV in our home, so I spent my entire childhood playing outdoors, or creating things inside. We made our own fun. My neighborhood was filled with kids ( 57 of them in fact) and summer evenings were filled with "Kick the Can", Tag, Red Rover, or some other group game. All of our mothers would holler our names when they thought it was time for us to come home. We never worried about getting kidnapped. It saddens me that now, the children no longer get the benefit of most of this type of childhood, and have traded for TV, computer games, processed foods, and video chats with relatives. I know just what your sadness is, Andy... maybe this virus is a reset to something better? Let's hope so.... keep those prayers going upwards, folks!!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    Steph, Rich and Andy ~ thank-you for your beautiful posts/stories that made my Sunday coffee taste even better. Nostalgia is a very potent antidote to very trying times like now and you blasted us away to a happier place even just for a moment. Happy Sunday!
    Happy Sunday to you, Dear Wendy.

    Seeing as how I'm an East Coaster, I'm up a tad earlier than you each morning, and must confess I start my day with a quick look at your Avatar to reaffirm my belief in another tomorrow and hope for all of us.

    Did Amazon deliver my Hug ?

  6. #16
    Senior Member Rich99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettin Man View Post
    What a wonderful story to share with us. Thank you.

    You and I grew up about the same time with similar experiences and memories. My great grandparents had owned quite a bit of property with a small lake on it, back in the early 1900's. For many years they made a comfortable living in the Ice Business. Many reading this would say What ? Ice ?
    Most have never heard the term, " Ice Box ", but back then that was the only form of refrigeration. Large blocks of Ice resting over the top of a closed cabinet to keep perishables from spoiling. All winter long they would cut blocks of Ice out of the lake and store them in a well insulated building for delivery the rest of the year. Early on it was delivered door to door from a Horse drawn Cart. My Grandfather took it over when my Great Grandparents passed on, and my Dad worked there as well until he enlisted in WW11.
    After the War an invention called the " Refrigerator " was a necessity for everyone and put an end to the Ice Business. My parents purchased my Grandfathers house on the lake and that's where I grew up with my brother. There were abandoned open pit mines miles away from us that had flooded and were teaming with all sorts of fresh water fish which we all spent a lot of time catching and transporting to our lake for neighborhood recreational fishing, and it became a very popular area on the weekends for family picnics.
    We eventually opened a small stand serving sandwiches, burgers, fries, ice cream, and cold drinks on weekends for the locals.
    As you said, it was a wonderful time to be alive, everyone knew everyone else, and it was like one big family. As Kuda said, no one locked their doors, and always left their car keys in the ignition. We had a Milk Man who came right up and left it on your porch or front steps, and a local grocery store who did the same thing on deliveries and always said, " You can settle up when you get paid "... Try that today, and you would be at the Mercy of " Porch Pirates "..
    I think back often to those days, an am deeply saddened that our kids and grandchildren will never know those kind of times.
    As Always Wonderful Post!!
    Right up till the day my Grandmother passed away (mid 90's) she called the fridge the ice box. The last 35yrs of her life she had an electric refrigerator, yet she would say to me Richie please get me the milk from the ice box lol. I guess we're all creatures of habit
    Andy we all love your stories! Please let me know if & when you need a new keyboard!! !!
    You're Special!!
    Here with You! since 9/29/09

  7. #17
    Senior Member Rich99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kuda View Post
    Rich,
    I remember the 50's and 60's too. That was a simpler time. We could leave our windows open and our doors unlocked.
    One of our aunts and uncles had a ferris wheel in their yard. We would go in the summer months and stay a few days with them. The ferris wheel was really tall and it could seat 2 people at once. It was so much fun to ride it.
    On Sundays my parents and my brother and I would go get hamburgers and french fries after Church. We really looked forward to that time together.
    Things will get better. Stay well everyone.
    Kuda, Wonderful Post! I would love to take a ride on that Ferris wheel with You!!
    xoxo
    Here with You! since 9/29/09

  8. #18
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    Interestingly, for Atlantic City there was a dealer at Borgata who had covid but overall the county actually has very few reported cases.

    Not sure if you guys have seen this map from Johns Hopkins but it's gotten very specific, you can see how many cases are in each county in the country and they update it every day:

    https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/a...23467b48e9ecf6

    Atlantic County, NJ only has 17 reported cases. I'm sure there are others but that's still extremely low for NJ. Looks like Northern NJ was hardest hit but because the Governor closed down casinos so early it didn't seem to spread there in great numbers.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by steph View Post
    Andy, Rich, and all others who grew up in those amazing times.... thank you for sharing those memories!! I often think back, and wonder if it was just my childlike viewpoint, or if they really were "the good ol' days". I lived in town... my grandparents lived about 10 blocks from us. Daily in the summer, I would go to their house for a visit. My grandmother was a fantastic cook, and always had some sort of baked goods ready for guests. Many mid-mornings, I was able to sample them warm out of the oven. If I was lucky, my grandfather was home ( he worked for the IRS and traveled a lot) and he would give me a dime or quarter ( back then, that was a LOT of money for a kid!!). There was a small grocery store ( they were all small back then) up the street on my way home.... Washington Grocery ( named after the street it was on). They had the most glorious selection of "penny candy" a kid could want. I would stop there on my way home, and fill up a small paper sack with treats... Black Jack gum, Beeman's gum, cinnamon bears, Tootsie Rolls, Bit O' Honey, Black Cow or Slow Poke suckers, Tootsie Pops... if it was a hot day, a Dreamsicle or Banana flavored Popsicle.

    The town I lived in was a tourist destination, and was built on a lake... so I spent my summers playing in the sand and water, returning home only for lunch, supper, and bedtime. There was a rec center there, and one could check out board games, tennis rackets, etc. and play all day. I spent hours riding my bike there and back... my towel for the beach wrapped around my handlebars. Winter brought sledding, and ice skating at a small ice rink about 1 block from our home. I can still remember the sound of the door that opened and closed as the kids came and went out of the warming house. It was a log cabin... with a santa-looking older man who ran it. In the center of the warming house was a big green barrel thing that he would stoke with wood. It smelled like a campfire in there all the time. The wood on the floor was fuzzy from so many ice skates cutting it up. Our mittens were made out of knit wool back then, and they would cake with snow that would ball up on them. "Santa" would take them from us, and place them on this huge, hot barrel.... they would sizzle as the snow melted from them... I can still hear and s-m-e-l-l that wool as it heated up on that wood stove. When the mittens were dry... Santa would flip them, and dry them for us... he tended those mittens like a short order cook, never letting them burn. When they were dry, he would give them back to us.. all warm and ready for our chilled fingers. I can remember the sound of our snow pants too, as we walked inside that warming house.

    We had no TV in our home, so I spent my entire childhood playing outdoors, or creating things inside. We made our own fun. My neighborhood was filled with kids ( 57 of them in fact) and summer evenings were filled with "Kick the Can", Tag, Red Rover, or some other group game. All of our mothers would holler our names when they thought it was time for us to come home. We never worried about getting kidnapped. It saddens me that now, the children no longer get the benefit of most of this type of childhood, and have traded for TV, computer games, processed foods, and video chats with relatives. I know just what your sadness is, Andy... maybe this virus is a reset to something better? Let's hope so.... keep those prayers going upwards, folks!!

    Wow.. We never knew how good we had it back then, it truly was Camelot ….

    Not once since those days have I thought about a Banana flavored Popsicle.. I close my eyes and I can still taste it, and would always finish it off with a YooHoo or Chocolate Cow drink..
    I worked after school for an hour or two at the little grocery store at the bottom of the hill and " Joe " would pay me with a fantastic Chocolate Malt from his little soda fountain which had 6 stools ..
    My Senior year in High School I pumped gas at night at a Sunoco gas station, and actually checked every cars motor oil when they got gas and cleaned their windshield without them asking. I remember it like it was yesterday, regular gas was $.32 a gallon, and we gave giveaways with a " fill up ", like Green Stamps, sets of Steak knives, and sets of glasses. After I graduated I started taking college courses during the day, and continued pumping gas at night.

    Right about then Sunoco came out with a promotional ticket, similar to todays scratch off Lottery tickets which offered cash prizes or free gas. Many customers told me to keep their ticket as a tip for the service I gave them regularly, and my Mom had more glasses, knife and fork sets, and dishes than she knew what to do with.

    I guess in a way I was lucky, and had 1 scratch off ticket worth $ 1,000, which was a small fortune back then. 12 days later I got my Draft Notice and wound up in Viet Nam for 15 months until I was wounded and spent 11 months in Rehab in Germany and Walter Reed hospital stateside.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettin Man View Post
    Wow.. We never knew how good we had it back then, it truly was Camelot ….

    Not once since those days have I thought about a Banana flavored Popsicle.. I close my eyes and I can still taste it, and would always finish it off with a YooHoo or Chocolate Cow drink..
    I worked after school for an hour or two at the little grocery store at the bottom of the hill and " Joe " would pay me with a fantastic Chocolate Malt from his little soda fountain which had 6 stools ..
    My Senior year in High School I pumped gas at night at a Sunoco gas station, and actually checked every cars motor oil when they got gas and cleaned their windshield without them asking. I remember it like it was yesterday, regular gas was $.32 a gallon, and we gave giveaways with a " fill up ", like Green Stamps, sets of Steak knives, and sets of glasses. After I graduated I started taking college courses during the day, and continued pumping gas at night.

    Right about then Sunoco came out with a promotional ticket, similar to todays scratch off Lottery tickets which offered cash prizes or free gas. Many customers told me to keep their ticket as a tip for the service I gave them regularly, and my Mom had more glasses, knife and fork sets, and dishes than she knew what to do with.

    I guess in a way I was lucky, and had 1 scratch off ticket worth $ 1,000, which was a small fortune back then. 12 days later I got my Draft Notice and wound up in Viet Nam for 15 months until I was wounded and spent 11 months in Rehab in Germany and Walter Reed hospital stateside.

    I can so relate, Andy!! I needed a job when I was young. I started working at 14 years old... a state program for "poor kids". My parents had divorced, and if I wanted anything like a pair of shoes, I had to pay for them myself. I raked our city park, painted all of the parking meters on main street, and sat in the city hall with grumpy older women tallying the liquor store receipts, and worked at the DNR crawling up the tower to look for smoke in the distance.

    At 15, I was skating along... literally... bringing trays that hung on the windows of cars filled with frosty mugs of A & W Rootbeer, and burgers and fries. It was there that I met my husband.... I knew he "liked" me because a large root beer was 15 cents, and he would always leave me a 25 cent tip.

    AT 16, I would go DAILY... honest... every day after school, I walked into the Anderson Drug store in our town and would ask Mr. Anderson if he was hiring today. After 6 weeks of persistence, he looked at me and said... "Young Lady.... I am going to hire you because anyone who is willing to do what you have certainly desires to work". I worked worked there all through high school... scooping ice cream at the soda fountain, and ringing up sales at the front register.

    My father owned and operated a gas station when I was around 10 years old.... I remember the dinging sound of the bell that rang when the car drove over the black hose that rang the bell. My father, with a blue oil stained rag always in his back pocket, would go to the driver's side window and say " Filler up?" I would watch him wash their windows, check their oil, and pump their gas. I remember the smell of his clothes when he returned home. I remember those green stamps too, and actually I still have a book of them. Across the street from the Washington Grocery ( mentioned in my last post) was the M & H gas station. I always marveled at their business... they had a huge platform in between the gas pumps where they stacked those glasses, dishes, etc. that you spoke of. Those glasses were colored... red, green, yellow, and blue. When the sun shone on them they were so pretty... or so I thought back then.

    Andy... God must really have a special assignment for you... wounded in Nam, and the accident not so long ago. Thank you for your service, Andy... I mean that. My husband just missed the draft... they changed it the year he got his number... and his number was 2.

    Can anyone tell that I am just a bit bored, and am using this forum as a means to alleviate that?? Sorry if I am boring anyone with my musings...
    Last edited by steph; 03-29-2020 at 06:27 PM.

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