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  1. #31
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    As a 21 1/2 year Marine Corps veteran of the long (for the most part..) time of peace following the Vietnam era, I have a hard time accepting the thanks of people for my service (though I appreiate them, of course) and would ask that everyone treat these newer vets, and those remaining of the Vietnam and other eras, as well as you can. Those folks are seeing and doing things that even I can only imagine; most specifically to the newer vets, the multiple trips in and out of combat regions. It warms my hear to see people doing things for them like you have. They are good people who volunteered to go out and help us in a battle with an enemy that is largely undefined and that we drive from place to place but that has a goal of killing every living being that doesn't want to accept their way of life. I know people have varying opinions, but none of the bombs detonated have every asked how a victim felt before they died...

    Anyway, thank you so much for taken that young man into your home. So many did come from bad situations and some place that reminds them of the home they may have never had makes it even better.

    Thank you!
    Last edited by RonC; 03-12-2018 at 05:41 PM.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonC View Post
    As a 21 1/2 year Marine Corps veteran of the long (for the most part..) time of peace following the Vietnam era, I have a hard time accepting the thanks of people for my service (though I appreiate them, fo course) and would ask that everyone treat these newer vets, and those remaining of the Vietnam and other eras, as well as you can. Those folks are seeing and doing things that even I can only imagine; most specifically to the newer vets, the multiple trips in and out of combat regions. It warms my hear to see people doing things for them like you have. They are good people who volunteered to go out and help us in a battle with an enemy that is largely undefined and that we drive from place to place but that has a goal of killing every living being that doesn't want to accept their way of life. I know people have varying opinions, but none of the bombs detonated have every asked how a victim felt before they died...

    Anyway, that you so much for taken that young man into your home. So many did come from bad situations and some place that reminds them of the home they may have never had makes it even better.

    Thank you!
    I thank you, Ron, for your service as well. An act of kindness bestowed upon me back then when I desperately needed one touched my soul, and was never forgotten. I didn't share the details of what this young man told me about the horrors he saw and experienced, and the friends he lost. Only one who shared a similar circumstance could understand, and I did. PTSD is not a phrase we knew back then but certainly carried the burden of it with us for eternity.
    I lost a dear friend and comrade who fought with me , was wounded with me, but we came back together to jeers, shaking fists, drinks and spattle thrown at our uniforms , and comments I won't even address. And 17 years later, on his 40th birthday, he took his own life while talking to me on the phone , and in front of his wife and children.
    The signs were there all along,we just never paid attention to them. My life changed after that, and people became very important to me every day of my life and I try to make a difference in some way every day with someone I meet.

  3. #33
    Senior Member thelma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kuda View Post
    It is so good reading about all the brave men that fought for our country. The wives deserve praise too. They kept the home front running.
    My dad was a Medic in the Army. He was stationed in Africa (Ethiopia). My mom wanted to be with my dad so she went to Africa and taught school. I was born in Africa. That was in 1958. People joke and ask me if I was born in a hut of course I was born in an Army Hospital. I was 6 months old when we went back to the U.S. I wish I was old enough to remember things about Africa but I was not old enough. We did bring back some really cool souvenirs while we were there.
    Kuda, my daughter's fiance's grandfather was a medic ETO WWII. He left an oral history with the Rutgers project. You can read his story here if you'd like. 80% casualty rate... horrific.
    About halfway through is when his combat 'story' begins
    http://oralhistory.rutgers.edu/inter...12-essig-james
    You can choose a .pdf version from here: http://oralhistory.rutgers.edu/inter...02-essig-james

  4. #34
    Senior Member flyguy's Avatar
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    When I talk to other military types and they thank me for my service, I reply that mine was nothing compared to theirs. The Air Force tends to have it much easier with just a few times of that feeling of extreme danger and looking at the end. I always tell those Purple Heart guys that my experience was nothing compared to theirs and I didn't leave any blood on the ground.
    I bet you I can stop gambling!

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyguy View Post
    When I talk to other military types and they thank me for my service, I reply that mine was nothing compared to theirs. The Air Force tends to have it much easier with just a few times of that feeling of extreme danger and looking at the end. I always tell those Purple Heart guys that my experience was nothing compared to theirs and I didn't leave any blood on the ground.
    I hear you. I was a cartographer (Recon Tech) and I never even got a paper cut. Wore khakis and blues to work. Half day off every week. Cuban missile crisis was pretty hairy but my service was a resort vacation comparatively. I have great respect for all combat guys.

  6. #36
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    Very nice and warm story. Thank you to all our service men and women for their service and for keeping us safe.

  7. #37
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    Thelma,
    Thanks for the information. I will read it.
    My dad was lucky he never was in the war area.
    Now, my husband is another story. He was in the line of fire all the time. He was shot and hit by a mortar. When they were trying to get him on the helicopter he got hit again. From the time he got back to the U.S. he had bullets and shrapnel in his back and legs. They told him he would lose one of his legs by the time he was 30. When he died at the age of 68 he still had both of his legs. He got out of the service when he turned 21 and he was bound and determined he would not lose his leg. He was 100% disabled when he got out of the service. Even though he went through a lot he was one of the kindness sweetest men I have ever met. He would do anything he could to help someone out. I was so proud to be his wife.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyguy View Post
    When I talk to other military types and they thank me for my service, I reply that mine was nothing compared to theirs. The Air Force tends to have it much easier with just a few times of that feeling of extreme danger and looking at the end. I always tell those Purple Heart guys that my experience was nothing compared to theirs and I didn't leave any blood on the ground.
    Hi flyguy,

    Any one who has the courage, intellegence, and God given talents to strap one of those incredible hunks of Jet powered metal on their back is a Hero in my book.
    The training, discipline, and courage required to wear those " Wings " made you one of a select few, and will always have my gratitude and respect.
    Many were the times that you " fly boys " pulled our butts out of the fire with your precision sorties and sent Brother Ho scurrying back to his Rabbit Hole, and allowed us to return safely.
    Any man or woman who has ever worn our countries uniform is a Hero to all of us.
    Last edited by Bettin Man; 03-14-2018 at 02:17 PM.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kuda View Post
    Thelma,
    Thanks for the information. I will read it.
    My dad was lucky he never was in the war area.
    Now, my husband is another story. He was in the line of fire all the time. He was shot and hit by a mortar. When they were trying to get him on the helicopter he got hit again. From the time he got back to the U.S. he had bullets and shrapnel in his back and legs. They told him he would lose one of his legs by the time he was 30. When he died at the age of 68 he still had both of his legs. He got out of the service when he turned 21 and he was bound and determined he would not lose his leg. He was 100% disabled when he got out of the service. Even though he went through a lot he was one of the kindness sweetest men I have ever met. He would do anything he could to help someone out. I was so proud to be his wife.

    A wonderful testament to an incredible person. I hear and feel your pain as I lost my first wife many years ago.
    You will always have those many years of happiness and laughter to relive over and over, and as long as we remember those times our loved ones live on through us and will give us comfort.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kuda View Post
    Thelma,
    Thanks for the information. I will read it.
    My dad was lucky he never was in the war area.
    Now, my husband is another story. He was in the line of fire all the time. He was shot and hit by a mortar. When they were trying to get him on the helicopter he got hit again. From the time he got back to the U.S. he had bullets and shrapnel in his back and legs. They told him he would lose one of his legs by the time he was 30. When he died at the age of 68 he still had both of his legs. He got out of the service when he turned 21 and he was bound and determined he would not lose his leg. He was 100% disabled when he got out of the service. Even though he went through a lot he was one of the kindness sweetest men I have ever met. He would do anything he could to help someone out. I was so proud to be his wife.
    Awe Kuda...this made me teary eyed. Your husband sounds like he was a wonderful man. Count yourself blessed to have had so many years with him!

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